Category Archives: God’s Reasons for Business

Foundations of Christian Stewardship Part II: It’s about God’s Agenda

The second element in understanding Biblical stewardship for Christian business owners is a natural follow-on to the first element, which was God owns everything and it is this:

All events are orchestrated by God to serve God’s agenda

This can be a bit disconcerting to us Type A people who like to control everything. We like to roll up our sleeves and get stuff done. But Proverbs 16.4 is clear: “The Lord works out everything for His own ends – even the wicked for a day of disaster.” (There are other passages that could be cited beyond this one)

As Christian business owners, we need to understand that trusting in God and replacing our agenda with His is the essence of trusting in God. Garrett writes:

“Biblical righteousness is fundamentally an attitude of trust in God, an attitude implicitly and explicitly demanded in 16:1, 3. Wickedness, too, is more than simple disobedience to the commandments; it is above all manifest in an attitude of pride” (Garrett, D. A. (1993). Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of songs (Vol. 14, pp. 152–153). Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers).

It is natural for us business owners to think about our agenda for our business. But have you ever taken time to learn from God what His agenda is for His business that He has entrusted to you? This directly goes to the core purposes for business: Passions, Products, Profits and Philanthropy. The four core purposes for business, collectively, need to be the organizing principle to which our businesses – our entrustment from the Lord – are tethered.

What is the Lord asking you to do with His business? How is He asking you to manage it, grow it, use it to further His kingdom? Are you developing the passions and talents in the people God has brought to you? Are you developing new products and services that will enable your community to flourish? Are you using your profits as directed by God – perhaps giving away more than is normal because God wants to bless you as a giver and wants to bless others engaged in other ministries? Does God’s agenda for your business drive your strategy and tactics?

Take time today to do an inventory of your person and work. Remember that God owns everything – including your business – and He will orchestrate the events of your life and your business so that you are working in concert with Him to accomplish His agenda.

Bill English

Do not Wear Yourself Out to get Rich

Proverbs 23.4: “Do not wear yourself out to get rich; have the wisdom to show restraint”.

Hmmm……

Are you serious? Turn away good customers who are ready to buy my products and services?

Yep.

Do you mean, work less even though I could make more money and thus give more money to God?

Yep. (Hint: God doesn’t need your money)

Are you kidding me? Restrain my sales team?

Yep.

Think about it.

Why would God have written this – intended for our good? I can think of at least four reasons.

First, when we throttle our businesses and our success, we purposefully create margin in our lives so that we have time for the things that really matter – time with God and with family. I’ve met way too many business owners who chase the next deal, loading up their over-worked staffs with more and more work because they are incapable of throttling themselves or turning down another deal. These individuals have no margin. They usually end up crashing, losing their marriages, key employees and losing their money too. They burnout. They didn’t build in margin. They tried to stuff too much work into too few hours.

Second, when we throttle our businesses and our success, we demonstrate that we love God more than money. Many successful business owners get a taste of success and they are instantly hooked. They become intoxicated. They become driven by their need for money – they love it – they love profits – they love wealth and riches. They pursue what they love and no matter how much they have, they always want more. Christians are not to be like this.

Thirdly, when we throttle our businesses and our success, we show our employees respect by not expecting them to work longer and longer hours to support more and more sales. We show that we want them to have a life outside of work and we support them by making sure their workload is reasonable.

Lastly, when we throttle our businesses and our success, we show that we value wisdom and understanding more than money or riches. Proverbs is constantly comparing the value of material wealth to wisdom and you know what? Wisdom wins every time. Have the wisdom…. It takes wisdom to show restraint, because only the wise understand the empty and fleeting nature of wealth.

Money and wealth will never make your happy. Never. Ever. Never. Never. Never. Never.

So don’t be fooled. Work hard – yes. Make money – yes (see Luke 19). But if you can make more by pushing yourself and your staff to being out of balance, then turn back and have the wisdom to show restraint. Money isn’t worth it. Turn your heart to Jesus Christ. Only He can fill that big, empty void you’re stuffing with money. Let Him fill you and you’ll find yourself having the wisdom to show restraint.

Bill English

When you Think about your Business, Think about the BOSS

When most people think about their boss, they think about an individual. Some bosses are great – others – not so much. But in this post, I want to propose that a Christian Business Owner should use the BOSS as a way to think about the fuller system in which their business exists and interacts.

You’ll recall that one of the four purposes for business is Productsthat business exists to provide a means to produce goods and services that allows the community to flourish. When one considers the ripple effects of a business within the broader system context, it easy to see how attention to delivering products and services that builds-up the community is serious business.

So, what is this larger system? It’s called the BOSS (Note: I am using this term as it is used in the training materials published by Interpersonal Communication Programs, Inc. 800-328-5099):

Business

Others

Self

Stakeholders

A comprehensive look at any business will include consideration of at least these elements:

  • Cash flow
  • Break even
  • Profitability
  • Process
  • Product and Service mix
  • Organizational structure
  • Plant and equipment
  • Employee morale and satisfaction
  • Risk mitigation
  • Governance
  • Business Development
  • Core Values
  • Short and long-term goals
  • Strategic plan

But often, the ripple effects of the business are not considered – at least not in a strategic sense. I would suggest that the wider system includes:

  • Extended family
  • Customers
  • Partners
  • Vendors
  • Shareholders
  • Board of Directors
  • The general community
  • The next generations (if family owned)
  • Church, ministries and charitable organizations supported by the payroll and profits of the business

When we consider the larger BOSS system, we start to realize that a single business with 40 employees (for example) doesn’t just touch 40 families, it like touches 100 or more families to one degree of intensity or another. Each part of this system contains its own critical information. In order for your business to function well, all parts of the system must be in place, functioning as they should. For example, if you’re not good at finding reputable vendors who deliver products and services at a decent price, then you’re likely to overpay for goods and services or purchase inferior products or services. Supply chain management is a serious aspect of having a well-functioning business.

What you’ll find is that your actions and decisions will seldom involve or impact only one part of the system. And if differences across the system are not managed well, the potential for conflict will only increase.

So, the next time you take your team off-site to do long-term planning, place your business at the center of the larger BOSS system and take a look at the ripple effects of your business within the BOSS system. Then ask the difficult question: is God pleased with the effects my business is having in the marketplace? Do I have a well-functioning system? He’ll answer you directly and clearly. Celebrate what you’re doing write and ask the Lord (and perhaps some outside advisors) what you can do to improve.

Bill English

Sorry, Christians Don’t Get to Retire

I have referenced how I believe that we will need to work well into our 70’s because I simply don’t believe that most have saved enough to be independently wealthy and whatever safety nets that are provided by the Federal Government will have negligible effect in 15 or 20 years.

But I’ve not dealt with retirement, as a concept, directly until now. So let me be direct and blunt:

The Scriptures do not support the notion of retirement.

Retirement implies stagnation, non-productivity and ceasing of growth. It has been retired. It is no longer useful. No longer helpful. No longer “part of the game”.

Sorry, Christians don’t get to become useless, unhelpful, irrelevant and unproductive. It’s not part of God’s plan and it’s not part of His will.

Work is a gift from God. Work existed before the Fall, so work is not a result of the fall nor is work part of the curse that God placed on Adam. I can find no place in the Bible where there is even a hint of support for our American concept of retirement – sitting back, relaxing every day, being non-productive and living off the money we have saved or inherited.

What I do find are passages like this:

Isaiah 60.21-22:

They are the shoot I have planted,

the work of my hands,

for the display of my splendor.

The least of you will become a thousand,

the smallest a mighty nation.

In Psalm 1.3, the Godly person is one who:

…is like a tree planted by streams of water,

which yields its fruit in season

and whose leaf does not wither—

whatever they do prospers

In 1 Corinthians 3.6, Paul uses the imagery of growth when he talks about him planting a seed, Apollos water but giving glory to God because He is the one who causes a person to grow.

One can even point to Philippians 1.3-5, where Paul writes:

“I thank my God every time I remember you. In all my prayers for all of you, I always pray with joy because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now, being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus.

The idea is that God never stops working in us to grow the “good work” and that He does so until the “day of Christ Jesus”.

The passages I have cited at the tip of the iceberg. There are literally dozens of passages that indicate that God is creative and that He wants us to work and grow until we reach heaven.

Now, this doesn’t mean you can’t sell your business as you get older, but it does mean that as a Christian, you’re not allowed to sit back and do nothing. You must be growing – developing – learning – becoming – until the day you see Christ face to face.

Sorry, Christians don’t get to retire.

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